SIP stands for “Session Initiation Protocol,” a computer language, not unlike Internet Protocol. A SIP “Trunk” refers to a concurrent call that is routed over the backbone of an IP Provider over VoIP, as opposed to using a T1 or BRI over the phone lines. SIP Trunking is far less expensive to both own, maintain, and use, than analog trunks.

In this edition of Head to Head, we will compare specific SIP trunking plans between Bandwidth.Com, parent company of Phonebooth, and Nextiva, the hosted VoIP powerhouse.

Provider Bandwidth
Visit Site
Nextiva
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Pricing, Metered $17.50 + $0.019/min $14.95 + 0.008/min
Pricing, Unlimited $30/mo $24.95/mo
Toll Free Inbound $0.029/min $0.029/min
Service Level Agreement Available Not Available
Own Their Own Network? Yes Yes
Tech Support, Phone 24/7/365, In-House Mon-Fri: 9AM-9PM EST, US-Based
Features – Inbound Calling (requires Bandwidth.com extension)
– 800 Inbound (requires purchase of port)
– Long Distance Termination
– Expanded Local Calling
– Outbound calling to 888, 877, 800 numbers
– e911
– 411 and Operator Services
– Inbound Caller ID and Location
– White Page Listing
– Toll-Free
– Domestic and International Long Distance
– G.711 and G.729a Codecs
– UDP & TCP
– Inbound Calling
– 800 Inbound (requires purchase of port)
– Long Distance Termination
– Expanded Local Calling
– Outbound calling to 888, 877, 800 numbers
– e911
– Inbound Caller ID and Location
– Toll-Free
– Domestic and International Long Distance
– G.711 Codecs
– UDP & TCP
More Details Visit Site Visit Site

Features:

On features, Bandwidth.com is a winner; on price, Nextiva is cheaper.So what features are the most important? Well, let’s first review the features. These are all features of SIP Trunking, not hosted VoIP features. Those features, in this scenario, would not be hosted, but on-premise.Each feature is an inbound or outbound calling feature. The choice of two codecs reflects whether your business has the additional bandwidth for higher call quality. UDP and TCP are both methods oftransmitting data over the internet.

Bandwidth.com has two important local features: 411 and White Page Listing. The White Pages, for those of you who only used phonebooks to reach high shelves, is a listing of local business. Similarly, 411 is an operator-assisted directory so that you can find a business or type of business. If you’re familiar with Bandwidth.com’s network, it makes sense. Bandwidth.com has built or bought a nationwide all IP CLEC network. Nextiva, not to be outdone, has a data supercenter in Arizona taking up 310,000 square feet, and redundant facilities in California and New York. Both networks are monitored 24/7 and use nothing but the best equipment. Bandwidth.com prefers to have many smaller networks spread out, while Nextiva has a few large network facilities. This is why Bandwidth.com has those local touches.

The Final Bell:

So the question comes down to whether those local touches are a difference maker to you. It’s certainly possible to register yourself to local business registries in any area, even if it costs a little, and Google is certainly supplanting 411 to look up businesses and addresses. Bandwidth.com may come out ahead in tech support, but their networks are both top notch. Because of price, I’m going to give the nod to Nextiva.

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